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3 Steps To Geotag Photos With GPX Track Logs In Lightroom

I always geotag my photos. I hate looking at a photo, be it professional or personal and having to ask myself "Where was that taken?" But what if you don’t have a GPS-enabled camera? Last week I did a review of Geotag Photos Pro 2, my app of choice for tracking my location during a landscape shoot.

If you’ve got a GPS tracker or a smart phone app, you can create a GPX track log while out on a shoot. Back in the studio, it’s just a few short clicks in Lightroom’s Map module to pair your photos with the track log and automatically geotag your shots. Here's a short video on the process. I've got some screen shots below with the overview of the steps, too.

3 Steps to Geotag In Lightroom

Once you have your GPX track log on your computer, jump into Lightroom's Map module. In a few clicks, you'll be all done.

1. Load the track log. Do this with Map > Tracklog > Load Tracklog. You can also use the track log icon in the map toolbar to load the tracklog.

Map > Tracklog > Load Tracklog

Select the GPX track log

GPX track log loaded

2. Select the photos to auto-tag. For me, I'm usually tagging all the photos from a trip, so I'll do a Cmd-A (Ctrl-A on a PC) to select all the photos.

3. Auto-tag the selected photos. Choose Map > Tracking > Auto-Tag Photos to pair up the selected photos with the track log. You can also use the track log icon in the map toolbar to do the pairing. 

Auto-tag selected photos

Photos are paired with the track log and geotagged automatically